The End of Normal

My “normal” has officially forever changed ever since graduation. While I don’t think life is ever in a state of complete normalcy, because people aren’t normal and everyday is a new day full of new adventures, there is no denying that a lot of things stay constant in our lives for given periods of time. My semi-normal was living at home, going to Mount Vernon Presbyterian School, seeing my friends, doing a ton of theater, working at the gym, performing acro routines, playing the occasional soccer game with my rec team, etc. This semi-normal no longer exists.
After Italy I didn’t go home back to “normal life.” I woke up in New York City and got on a plane to Vermont to visit Zeno Mountain Farms, a collection of friends with diverse needs, where I went to camp for a week and got to be in a movie; that’s not normal. And now (well while I’m writing this even though I won’t have internet to send it until I’m back in NYC), I’m at Capon Springs, our family reunion place in West Virginia that is essentially Dirty Dancing without the dancing (or the dirty as someone also felt we should clarify on our teen hayride last night).
While Capon is kind of normal because we go every summer, it isn’t like the rest of the year because we get to just chill and run around with friends playing badminton and shuffle board and ultimate frisbee and really whatever we want without phone connection and limited internet. Plus I continue to travel after this. Next I’ll be in NYC and then Ohio before returning home for a weekend before orientation and then my first year retreat and trip to Scotland with the other Stamps Presidential Scholars at Georgia Tech. Then we get back and only have a day before I move into my college dorm and my life is forever different, cus college…
It’s just so crazy to think that everything I once considered to be normal life is never fully going to exist again. I will be attending a different school with different some friends, and new activities, and living in a new place all together. And that will continue to be slightly weird until one day I wake up and realize that this new life is my new normal.
Obviously not everything will change, and with being only about 20 minutes from my house, honestly less will probably change than the normal college student; however, it is just weird that it finally hit me that it’s officially the end of normal.
And while all of this traveling has been quite fun, it’s also a little scary to think about how much is going to change all at once, because unlike a lot of other recent graduates I know, I wasn’t as super ready to “escape” as some said. But it doesn’t really matter if I’m ready or not, because now it’s just time to live in the present and adjust to this new normal that’s out there, even if, like this summer, one day that normal becomes constant change. Change in my opinion isn’t always good or always bad, but it is ever present and full of new opportunities.
So good bye normal. It was nice knowing you.
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Escaping Technology

imgres.jpgAfter a week of no cell service or internet while at my family reunion in West Virginia, I’m now back to a world of college touring, conference calls, interview planning, essay drafting, book reading, summer-mathing, and lots of emailing. Once my phone finally got service again, I had 154 texts and 94 emails to go through.

Every year when I go to Capon (oddly enough they have a website now), I end up blogging afterwards about how much I surprisingly enjoy the fact that there is no connection to the outside world. It’s nice to de-stress by unplugging every now and then, and it’s the one place I can go and have a good reason to just not respond to things for a little. I play outside with friends everyday doing everything from badminton to hiking to shuffle board to just playing cards. I try not to worry about all of the millions of things I have to get done by next school year. I have talks about life with people of all ages that I’ve known since birth. It’s just a great time spent with fun friends and family, delicious home cooked food, and tons of space to wander and wonder in.

The odd thing is how few places there are on Earth without wifi and cell service. I was reading a book called The Circle that was pondering the effect of technology on people, and describing how eventually there will likely be no way of escaping it’s grasp. Is that ok? It’s not a “good vs. bad” thing, because it’s both really, but I guess the question is whether or not we want this to be our future reality. Do we want to live in a world where we can’t escape technology?

As much as I love Capon, I know it’s hard for many people to visit who have jobs where they are expected to have various conference calls, or do payroll, or accomplish some task. Not everyone takes the week off to go to Capon and therefore, some people still have to climb up to the golf course and try to find a spot that get’s service in order to keep up with the rest of the world. So there are the good and bad sides to no technology, but eventually there may not be a choice at all; what will we do then?

 

Physical and Mental Practice

imgres.jpgIt’s amazing how you can be out of shape from playing the flute. I haven’t played in a few weeks because I’ve been at the gym more than I’ve been at home, but I plan on playing in a talent show next week so I was practicing today. I played some a few days ago as well, and after the two practices I can physically notice how I haven’t practiced in a while; my arms and mouth just can’t hold out for as long as usual without feeling funny. I lost some of my flute stamina that I was so proud of building up during this last school year.

Really everything is like this, where if we don’t practice for a while than it takes longer to get back to where we were, it’s just that some activities we notice it more than others.

For example we have a young gymnast on team who is a really hard worked, but she was highly considering quitting because after having a few weeks off we think she was pretty sore and noticeably wasn’t where she use to be which was making her feel bad physically and mentally. However, between her mom and the coaches we’ve convinced her to keep coming to practice at least for the summer and have started to notice her enjoying herself again since she’s been practicing.

Now in this case, even more than my flute incident, the effects of time off are quite obvious, but they aren’t always. The mind is another muscle that can get sore after too much time off, but when properly exercised you find yourself enjoying using the muscle.

I’ve read more books so far this summer than I have for pleasure in a long time. I was walking through Barnes and Nobel the other day and was helping my brother look for books when I started seeing all of these old books I remember reading. Some I really liked, and others I really didn’t, but all of them brought back found memories of being young and having time to just read.

My brother is not so found of reading, but we keep trying to get him to read. We had a challenge last week to see which of the two of us could finish our book first, but he tried complaining that I was a better reader. (Funny thing being that I’m not too fast of a reader I just actually take time to read.) So my mom pointed out to him how you only become a better reader by reading more. Then he ended up finishing his book last week  despite thinking he couldn’t (though I did beat him), and in fact he really enjoyed it and felt good about finishing so he started another.

It’s rare that you see so immediately a cause and effect situation like that, but playing the flute, our young gymnast, and my family reading challenge reminded me of the importance of constantly practicing our skills if we hope to maintain and improve them; both the physical and mental.

Age=Grade Level, But Why?

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If you read some of my summer posts, you may recall the family reunion place in West Virginia called Capon that mine and many other families go to every year over 2nd week of July. We have a lot of really close friends because of Capon and we usually only get to see them once a year, but since we were all ready in Virginia, we decided to visit one of our good family friends that have 13 and 11 year old boys.

It’s funny because while we are at Capon you don’t really know everyone’s age or what grade they are in necessarily because it doesn’t matter. Naturally, you tend to form strong relationships with people within a few years of you, but that just depends on the maturity level and interests of different people.

My mom compares Capon to a smaller version of Dirty Dancing and Nerverneverland. It’s a close community of friends and family where you are always a kid growing up and there is always so much to do and explore, but “What happens at Capon, stays at Capon” as we say. I always love Capon, and I always learn something new which is often specifically due to the different ages of my friends.

It makes me curious as to why schools are divided by age rather than interest and maturity. It isn’t even like the system for what grade you are in is universal. In New York the cut off is  December 31, but in Georgia it is September 1, and in Virginia it is September 30, and in Ohio it is October 1. That’s just a few, but non of them are the same. Where do these random cut off dates come from? Why are these the magic dates? It’s silly if you ask me.

(Warning: I learned all of this from hearing stories from my mom, so I don’t know how accurate my memory will be.)

In New York I had started school early and was set to go into Kindergarden a year early because everyone else in my twos group was in that cut off group and my birthday is at the beginning of January. New York apparently makes exceptions like that as long as there is a teacher recommendation. However, when we moved to Georgia in March I would have been 2 as of the last September 1st, so they wanted to put me in a twos class rather than a pre-k like where I should have been. My mom supposedly tried asking teachers if I could be tested or anything so I could get moved ahead like I would have been because she knew I could be, but in Georgia they wouldn’t make the same exceptions.

If a child is capable why should a number hold them back? (Sound familiar…numbers…grades…holding students back…) In the “real world” people are never all the same age in a work force, and it isn’t unlikely for younger people to have higher up jobs. It is about talent and drive and self-motivation; that is what puts you at a certain “level” so to say, so why are school grade levels determined by age?