Time to Practice

I find myself creating a list of things that I’d like to do, but then I never get around to working on them. Like playing the flute for example.
I’ve played the flute since 4th grade, but this past year I only practised a few times all year. I like playing music. It’s fun to test my fingers, breathing, and mind for how complex of songs I can play and see for how much time I can continue to play. It’s a practised skill though, so the more I practice the better my breath control and the longer I can play. I guess eventually though, the better you get, the more likely you are to stay at a more advanced level.
I was thinking about this while practising flute today for the first time in a while. I was impressed that I played for as long as I did – not really sure how long it was, but it was longer than I expected to be able to play. A similar experience happened when I decided to play soccer last night. I knew I’d be rusty considering I hadn’t played all year despite telling myself I’d play of fun in college, but surprisingly I wasn’t as rusty as I was expecting. A lot of the skills I had gained from playing over the past 16 years of playing must have somehow been ingrained into my muscle memory because, while I wasn’t great, I somehow managed to have decent control and footwork; the difference is now I’ve just been really sore today…
I love having time and easy access to just jump into old skills. It’s the time of year where I reassess what I’ve done in the past year and what skills and practices I want to bring more into my life again.
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Leaving with Action

Today was the last day of the International Seminar on Amplifying Student Voice and Partnership. It was a much more laid back and open space kind of day, which was honestly really great. It allowed everyone to make what they wanted out of the conference and have the conversations most meaningful to them.

During my first session, I ended up in an informal group that gathered together and started talking about the college application process. Two rising seniors were stressed about the process and therefore, myself and a few adults were giving tips about researching and applying to schools. This conversation made me realize I actually have a lot to share on the topic and reminded me that most students don’t have the amazing college councillors that I had who helped me navigate the process. Additionally, most students don’t have practice in talking about and essentially pitching themselves. Due to my blog writing, I had ample experience with talking about myself by the time I had to write those essays, but most students don’t have a blog and never really practice this skill in high school. Talking about yourself is a huge part of life because after college then comes job applications where it’s a similar process all over again. For that very reason, I wish more schools spent time talking about identifying key stories in your own life, and pitching your own story and knowing your strengths and skills that can be brought to the table in various situations.

These two students I was talking to come from learner-centered environments, and even there this process is stressful and these two believed they don’t have a story to tell. Let me tell you, these kids have incredible stories to tell and I only know parts of them, so it’s crazy for me to think that they don’t believe they have a story. It just goes to show that even great schools still have room to grow and that was a humbling experience today. Every student should feel like they have a story worth hearing and get the opportunity to practice telling it.

Later in the day I got to achieve my personal goal for this conference. I came to this conference really wanting to have a take away- an action step I could take in order to start moving beyond just talking and sharing with other communities and head towards working together on project work to advance the movement. Proud to say that I have my next project to start tackling. IMG_0930.JPG

Whenever I go to a conference there are multiple people who ask about how the community will stay connected. Then there end up being group chats and social media accounts created and they’re explosive with reflection for the first few weeks after the conference is over, but they fizzle out over time. Why? My assumption based on observation is that most forms of connection post-conference have been simply for the sake of connection/networking, but in order to sustain connections we must have a unified purpose that brings us back to the conversation wanting more.

I’m not yet sure what this purpose is; however, I’m excited to start working on figuring out how we can build upon the community by finding ways to connect with purpose. Three other young learners and I, started brainstorming potential designs for a website based on what menu items we wanted as possibilities for ways the community to connect. For example a blog to share out work in different environments, a directory to know who’s doing what kind of work, a jargon translator to serve as an explanation guide for all the different terms we like to use, a project space for people interested in partnering on projects, a monthly chat around essential topics, etc.

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Then we broke our work down into four areas: user feedback, research, “playing around”, and mission development. We hope to each spend the next month working in our areas to learn about what the community would want in a connection tool and figure out a game plan for the best tool to make these ideas a reality by playing with existing tools while experimenting with what building your own website would take resource wise.

IMG_7624.jpegThe key wonder I have right now though is: what already exists? There are a lot of groups that keep trying to create something very similar to this and yet don’t seem to be working for this or that reason, but why? I’m not sure entirely. I hope to find out and I have my assumptions based on personal experience. I’m happy to be leaving with a game plan but to help get further in our efforts, if you read this post and believe you know of sites or organization or groups or social media connections, etc that sound similar to this kind of work, I would love to see things in the comments to guide our upcoming research. (Even if I’m technically taking lead on user insight gathering, so I’d be happy to hear that too even before I get more focused questions to ask on the topic.)

A Chance at Greatness

Earlier today I read this article about the application process to get into middle schools and high schools in New York. It’s crazy!!!

(I’d strongly encourage reading this article before reading the rest of my post because it provides helpful context.)

I remember applying to colleges all too vividly and it was stressful and tiresome and promoted all sorts of self-doubt amongst teens. For students applying to some schools, your shot all boils down to a bunch of numbers – that’s terrifying. From what I can tell, it seems like some kids go through this same process as early as when they’re 10-11 and only just about to enter 6th grade- that seems outright wrong.

Even looking past the equality debates and economic pull for a second (though very real issues as well), what 10-year-old should have to be thinking about how their grades will affect the rest of their life: the odds of getting into a good middle school leading to odds of going to a good high school leading to odds of being well prepared for college. Sure you may think, “Well the child probably isn’t worrying about all of the grades and applications and portfolios; the parents are the ones to really send stuff in,” but what is the likelihood parents don’t start pressuring their kids more and more with each year the academic game gets more competitive? Parents just want their kid to go to a good school, but what has to happen for them to get there?

And let’s keep in mind elementary school “grades” are basically assessing things like multiplication to the power of 12 and a few basic sentences written in a row.

I couldn’t read well until 2nd grade, does that mean I shouldn’t have gotten a chance at a good education?

This article honestly made me consider even beyond this apparent problem with New York City schools. I realized that there are often complaints about the ways that higher education admits students, but how often do we consider all of the k-12 schools who also have application processes? How do they work? How heavily are grades and standardized tests considered? Are children truly looked at holistically?

I’m just throwing out questions because I really don’t know how it works. I had never considered how lucky I am to have gone to the same school for middle and high school. A lot of kids go to a different school every four-ish years of their life because that’s just how neighbourhood schools tend to work. I, on the other hand, switched to a private school when I was going into 6th grade and then got to just stay at that school. I didn’t have to deal with applying to a new high school, or meeting new friends, or getting used to a new school system.

I vaguely remember the application process going into 6th grade. I’m sure my records were sent in and then I remember having an interview where they asked me to solve some basic math problems and take a few “creativity tests.” I only applied to one school. If I didn’t get in and didn’t get financial aid, I would’ve gone to our local middle school despite it being known as, “not a good school.” I was fortunate to make it in and to be on scholarship, but many don’t get that same chance.

My life would be completely different had I not switched schools in 6th grade. Completely and utterly so, I’m certain of it.

I hate that there even exists rumours of “not good schools.” Shouldn’t every child get to go to a great school? School is honestly one of the biggest parts of childhood. We spend 35+ hours a week in school for roughly 180 days a year. That amount of time spanning from age 5-18 (and some kids spend longer than that), adds up to an underestimate of about 16,380 hours spent in k-12 school during childhood. That’s a ton of time!

Obviously, this article I read is focused primarily on how the system to apply to schools is corrupt, but in my opinion, if the schools supposedly “not good” we just transformed to be better, then maybe the application system would self-fix to some extent. Every school has a different culture. Two schools can be entirely different and yet both equally great for the right child. The school application process should be about finding what culture of a school is best for each individual child, not about children competing to be admitted into the select few great schools.

School influences life; there is no questioning that anymore in the age we live in. Being okay with some schools just not being great is like saying not all kids deserve a chance at a great life.

We need all schools to be great.

There’s Always Theater

As much as I love it, I have never thought about a career in performing arts. It’s just never been something I could see myself doing. The realism in me knows it’s not the most stable or easy path to make it in, plus I have multiple family members in that business so I know what it’s really like. Not to mention, I just feel like there are other things I also want to do.

Despite all of this, I always seem to find myself in a theater as one of my mentors pointed out today. I’ve been to basically all of the productions my old school put on this year, performed in a few at college, and even just this weekend I’m helping with running the spotlight for my siblings’ dance show.

I just can’t seem to escape, and I don’t think I have a problem with that. The theater is great! You get to be crazy and serious, lyrical and sharp, witty and stupid, and everything in between. It’s a place to learn new skills and gain better practices for life, and the people you meet are often the most supportive and creative people who will push you beyond what you ever thought possible of yourself. It’s all just an amazing world that I’m glad to be able to stay a part of even as I grow older and move around more often.

“Core Courses”

Today my textbook finally arrived for the online class I’m taking until the end of June. I’m taking US History post-1865 basically just because it’s a core requirement and I’m not a fan of history classes, so I thought online over the summer would allow me to go at my own pace and get it over with faster.

The annoying thing is that I feel like I know most of this stuff already. Well maybe not “know” but I’ve definitely learned it all before; as in I couldn’t take a final this second and ace it, though while listening to lectures and reading the book it’s all the same stuff I’ve been getting taught since 4th-grade history. It’s the same old survey course where we get through a few high lights of history without really diving deep into it or actually applying what we learn.

I hate how so many core courses in college seem to be this way. They’re just the same old worn out courses with information we’ve been learning since 4th grade. Essentially the way I see it, higher ed has decided that they can’t trust the 12 years we spend in primary school, thus they make us retake all of those courses again.

Furthermore, if this is the case and higher ed makes students retake these courses all over again, then why can’t high school focus on other things and let college handle the survey of xy and z courses?

Cleaning Up

It was crazy to move out of my dorm and realize just how much stuff I have!!! Now it’s been even harder trying to go through stuff and organize everything. I just spent the last hour or so going up and down stairs trying to figure out what’s just needed at college versus what I need this summer and in a weird way it’s kind of been nice.

Sorting through things, realizing how I don’t need nearly as much as I have, and overall being weirdly relaxed trying to find a spot for everything and finally being able to walk through my room again.

End of the year cleaning up is sometimes just what needs to be done.

Zooky Zooky

Well tonight was our banquet so it’s official, I have finished my first year as a member of DramaTech!!!

I’m forever grateful that even at a tech school there are so many passionate and talented artist that I’ve gotten to know and work with this year, and I’m excited for many more years! Growing up should never be an excuse to not continuing to follow your little passions and I’m glad that I didn’t let college stop me from acting.

It’s been an amazing year, though at the banquet tonight, I realized that I could’ve been so much more involved than I was and I hope that next year I start to find more ways to be engaged in the theater here at GT. Time is obviously always a struggle to find, but I think I could have done more to try to help with the tech side of shows that I wasn’t in so maybe next year I’ll take advantage of those opportunities more.

I’m most excited though to hopefully be cast in A Midsummer Night’s Dream for the 4th time and would love to reprise my role as Puck one more time. So here’s to another year of revolting props, dirty costumes, clickity taps, dusty black boxes, great laughs, big applauses, crazy stories, and fulfilling bows!

Accumulating

I have so much stuff. Sometimes I forget this because everything is in a spot to some extent. Today though I started packing up my dorm room to bring things home, and there was no way to not notice how much stuff I had.

One of the random learning moments of my first year was realizing just how few clothes I really wear. I’m used to spending summers away from home where I basically live out of a suitcase clothes-wise, and honestly, I probably could do the same in college plus a few extra pairs of things and some random occasion clothing. Yet while packing I noticed so many shirts in particular that I didn’t wear all year, but they’re the kind of shirts that I also can’t bring myself to not have around just in case.

It’s interesting how we accumulate things over the years that we just can’t seem to get rid of. Things like old camp shirts, or gifts, or those things you always think might just come in handy one day so you’d rather be safe than sorry so you keep it around.

Maybe next semester I’ll change my ways…

Finals are Here and I’m not an Engineer

Earlier today I received my first official email from the Scheller College of Business. That’s right, I’ve finally declared a major, and it isn’t what most people expected. download-2.jpg

Since I started really thinking about where I wanted to go to college (so basically since junior year of high school), I have kind of avoided the question of what I wanted to major in. People would tell me,  “oh you’re good at STEM and like problem-solving, you should be an engineer!” I figured, why not. I didn’t have much of a better idea of what I wanted to do, but I knew I wanted to continue doing design thinking, and I knew education was at the very least a passion of mine. I firmly believe that design thinking is a mode of thought pertaining to every discipline and major, but I’ve observed that higher education doesn’t seem to apply this notion to degree curriculum plans where it seems that only a few majors really dive deep into principles of design thinking.

I realize now that at the end of my high school career I spent far more time looking at colleges then I really spent learning about different majors offered. It’s said that it doesn’t matter what major you choose, and that’s fair, all majors are “good majors” and each is “hard” in their own way- that’s not how you should choose a major. It’s said, “a lot of the first few semesters is the same for everyone”, and I’ve found this to be true too, there are a lot of core requirements that all first years take. It’s also said that it’s fine to come into college as an undecided major- this is the one I have some problems with.

I entered college in undecided engineering, so I say all this from the perspective of someone is living out the life of an undecided major. Now don’t get me wrong, I think it makes sense that an 18-year-old doesn’t have their life completely together yet, which is what they tell you when you think you’re going to apply as undecided. However, once you get to college you have way less time to try and contemplate what major you want to go into. And sure people say you have time to decide on a major, but really what they mean is, “We want you to decide by the spring, that way at least you’re in something. Then we can deal with you changing your major later if that’s what you need to do.” (This isn’t me implying, I’ve been told multiple times that even though most classes are practically the same for the first few semesters, they still want you to pick a major by the end of spring.)

The other hard thing is that I like to talk to people to learn about the different majors. However advisors are figured out by major, and undecided engineering majors are just clumped with mechanical engineers because it’s the “most general engineering.” So my experience was that all of the advisings was really just focused on mechanical which wasn’t very helpful when looking to just learn more about different majors before making a decision. Thus I also tried talking to other advisors, but some advisors only speak to their specific major (including business…).

The big thing that I realized throughout this process, and in general since being in college, is that working in the realm of innovative education is more than just a passion of mine. I think I’d really like to continue working on forwarding the Education Transformation Movement as at least an initial career. download-1

It’s when I made this realization that I finally started to question if engineering was right for me. I started thinking instead about what’s kind of become a motto of mine, “could not should.”

When I applied to MVPS at the end of 5th grade, I was given a creativity question during my interview. The question asked, “List all the things you could do with a pencil.” So I did: write, use as a bookmarker, keep a locker open, hair piece, stab someone,… When I was telling my mom this story afterward this is the point she stopped me and said, “ANYA PLEASE TELL ME YOU DIDN’T SAY YOU COULD STAB SOMEONE WITH A PENCIL!!!” My response was, “It asked what you could do not what you would or should do.”

I got into the school, so as my mom and I like to think, we guess they accepted that I was taking the question very literal for the sake of creativity. But despite what my interviewer thought, my friends and family have never let me forget this story, and I’m kind of grateful because it’s become a good motto.

I’m not one to lack confidence, and I truly believe that if I wanted to, I have the brain power and persistence to where I could become an engineer. However, this doesn’t necessarily mean that I should just because I could. As I started to think about this possibility I realized that I’ve never been one to particularly love activities closely associated with being an engineer, like creating CAD models, or using power tools, or running data analysis on experiments. I’ve never hated these activities when given the chance to work on them, but in a team setting, for example, someone else is always the “engineer” role.

download.jpgSo I’ve switched to business because I want to be a social entrepreneur and oppose to spending my time learning about thermal dynamics, I’d rather focus more on leadership studies, risk management, startup and entrepreneurial culture, change theory, etc. And I’m excited about how the business school is really focused on real-world applications and has extra advising specifically for looking at career paths and getting all students to have an internship/co-op/study abroad experience before graduation. In particular, I’m currently looking to do a concentration in Leading and Managing Human Capital and get a certificate in Social/Personality Psychology, and I hope to also do an exchange in New Zealand to take some education courses and/or maybe do research there. I’m excited to plan more of what’s ahead as I start to meet with my new advior soon.

This was a hard choice, especially since there is a big stigma around business majors at GT. Students consider it the “easy major” and try to claim the students in business aren’t as smart as other majors. But I know some amazingly smart people in business, and we all got into GT just the same, and I’m not transferring because I thought engineering was going to be “too hard.” It’s all just relative. So I’m proud of myself for finally submitting my form and making the choice to go all in. If I end up changing again, so be it, but now that first semester classes are over, I’m feeling pretty good going into finals tomorrow having a bit more of a direction with my college path.

 

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And with that, as tradition goes:

A merry finals to all,

And to all crammers,

Good luck and good night!

No More Big Long Poo Scenes

One of the weirdest parts about the transition to college for me has been the fact that old jokes and traditions are no longer relevant.

Because my high school was so small, pretty much everyone at least knew of each other, and groups of students tended to have a lot of the same classes together. Thus, when you see the same people in almost every class almost every day, you end up making a lot of inside jokes. We could practically have full conversations that were just fragments of statements, but we would understand each other perfectly because everything would relate to some inside joke.

However, now I keep finding myself in that situation where I go to say something that is hilarious to me, but then I realize no one else gets it…

The same thing started to happen my senior year in theater. I would reference an old show only to discover that no one else was in that show- that was already weird. Now in college theater is where I notice it the most because shows tend to remind you of other shows and other theater stories, but now every story is completely new and a bit less relevant and more out of context.

As tonight is opening night of my first full-length college production, I’ve really been getting nostalgic about how so many of my old traditions have somewhat come to an end. One of my traditions was that every show we did I would create a “cheat sheet” which was essentially a break down of each scene, who was in it, what needed to happen during transitions, what props were used, and any important lines that were hard to remember. On this list, I would also come up with a weird name for each scene in order to remember it by.

FullSizeRender.jpgMy sophomore year I was working on a show called Mort (actually my favorite production of high school). One of the scenes in this show was particularly long and had only 3 actors in it, but a ton of props and complex blocking, so it took the actors days before it was done being blocked. (For non-theater nerds, blocking is essentially the process in rehearsals of figuring out where to stand or what to move when.) Thus when naming this scene I called it “The Big Long Poo Scene.” The name stuck, and then we realized that every show has that one scene that’s just a pain in the butt to get and takes forever to finally finish correctly. From then on, every show had a “Big Long Poo Scene”- it was a tradition.

Now in college, I still made my “cheat sheet” because it was very much needed for transitions so everyone knew what they were moving when;

however, I didn’t label a “Big Long Poo Scene.”  It just didn’t feel right because no one would understand the significance.

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I know that I’ll make new inside jokes and traditions with new people here, I already have some, but it’s sad to realize the end of an era. Sad to think we won’t be going to our traditional pre-show dinner places.

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Sad to think there won’t be a post-show elevator ride.

 

 

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Sad to think that tonight will come and I won’t be standing in a circle holding hands with my cast, crew, and director and waiting for the day I’m a senior and get to stand next to the director; in fact, my director won’t even be at opening night because of personal family reasons.

It’s just sad.

Don’t get me wrong, I’m also happy. There’s so much to come and tonight’s still opening night which is always stressful and exciting, and I love my new drama family here at Tech.

Though I know when I do my pre-show warm-up shakedown tonight, my theater family will be in my heart right there with me, because I’m missing them a lot right now especially knowing this is also their show night and I’m not there.

Theater Family Tree (2)