Navigating the Bends

This is now my 3rd year as a cohort member of the Innovation Diploma and everyday I’m noticing new ways that we have grown overtime.  

Just today we were having a”Team Up” moment Image result for riveras we know are calling it, where we all gathered to debrief on where we are at and where we need to be at by tomorrow. We quickly identified that there was some miscommunication in terms of what everyone believed to be our definition of done for the current project we are working on. (The topic of the project is irrelevant for the purpose of this post, but in case you’re curious, we are working getting more traffic and awareness of our outdoor classrooms.) After coming to this realization, we talked things through as a team and were able to come to a consensus and decide on how to proceed.

I’m not really sure how to describe this process we went through, but after this Team Up took place, some of our observing faculty members commented on how fascinating it was to watch us. They said that it was really impressive to see a group of students lead this process of critical thinking about clarifying their task to help a client.

I found this funny because I hadn’t even thought about how it may seem impressive that we were able to have that conversation. To me those deep and messy conversations have become normal, but it wasn’t always this way. Thinking about it now, I realize we’ve grown into being able to have these conversations. With experiance being thrown into high stress, real world, situations with real stakes, we’ve learned how to better navigate the bends in the river.

It’s amazing how we change overtime without even noticing it sometimes, but then we look back and realize just how far we’ve come.

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It’s a Small World

Drew for Waitress.jpegAnother fun day in the great city of NYC! I woke up late today, but to my surprise my grandma already had an idea for today, since our previous plans of visiting Hampshire College got delayed until Monday due to transportation. We ended up deciding to get dressed up and head down to midtown and see if we could get last minute tickets to a matinee for some show.

As awesome as luck can be, we ended up getting seats for “The Waitress” despite arriving
at the theater only 15 minutes before show time! It’s unlike most Broadway musicals because it’s very real; there’s no flying or make believe lands or seemingly impossible plot lines. The show is about a fantastic pie maker and waitress who’s in a bad marriage, has an unwanted pregnancy, an affair with her married doctor, and is really just searching for a way to make a happy life for herself and her baby on the way.

Waitress set.jpegThe show was touching and had a very talented ensemble, but what really inspired me today was right after the show. Being an actress herself, my aunt has come to know many people in the theater industry. In fact her ex-boyfriend who she’s still good friends with, is the conductor for the “Book of Mormon” currently, and he seems to know people in everything. Between the two of them, they knew several people in the show we saw this afternoon and after a few texts and phone calls, we were able to arrange for us to go backstage with the male lead.

What inspired me about this situation is how it’s such a small world in the theater industry. Everyone seems to know someone else, and most everyone is happy to do a favor for a friend. It’s just such a tight group of people that you’d be kind of surprised. Plus even if people don’t know each other, theater people are some of the most open and naturally collaborative people I know. (Most of the time, there are always exceptions…)Anya pose Waitress.jpeg

The connections today, as well as my work with PAINted this week, even gave me an idea for next year’s hopeful new theater club some of my friends are trying to start. The idea is for one of the things for us to do next year is to spend time seeing shows at other high schools to try to build our own community of theater students in Atlanta.

Glad to be Exhausted

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Wow I’m exhausted after today. I always forget how tiring design thinking can be until I spend a day going through a challenge and then stop, only to find myself drifting off to sleep.

The reason I find it so exhausting is because design thinking requires so much constant energy and brain power. You are constantly trying to keep moving forward and observing, analyzing, empathizing, synthesizing, prototyping, iterating, interviewing, pitching, storytelling, etc. (Not in any particular order.) Not to mention the entire time you are working with several other people that you’re trying to learn more about in order to best work together and keep the whole team on track and moving in a positive direction; which sometimes means pivoting your idea and going back 5 steps in order to move forward 10.

At the end of day 2 of fuse16 today, I looked around and you could see how tired everyone was. Everyone was excited about their prototypes and empowered by the users, and that just makes it all the more tiring, because when you’re invested in a project you give it your all and that is what makes design thinking tiring. At least we’re tired for a good cause though, so it’s like a good tired. Like when you just played an intense game of soccer with no subs, so you feel as if you’re about to pass out; however, your team won because you stayed in the entire time so at the same time you’re on cloud 9 by the end of the game because you accomplished what seemed impossible!

I always say, even half a day of design thinking makes me more tired at the end of the day then just a normal day of classes. However, I wouldn’t trade that half of a day to not be tired, because the feeling I get from seeing my work impact my user is worth every minute of stretching our brain muscles to the max.

So I’m glad that I can barely hold my eyes open right now, because that means we had a great day of meaningful working.

Ignite the fuse16

It’s almost here!!! Fuse16 starts tomorrow at 8:30am and I’m so pumped to get this launch this plane! My tool kit is all packed, my MoVe talk is prepped, and even had a great conversation with Grant Lichtman and the Bolles School today to get those design thinker thoughts flowing even more! It’s time ignite the fuse!

Taking Ownership

Today was the official last day of school for everyone at MVPS, which also means that we have officially finished a full year of the first ever student designed AP course!!! The Collab Course adventure has come to an end in some ways, but in other ways our adventure has only just begun. So for my final assignment I have created the MoVe Talk (Moment of Visible Empathy) below to capture a snapshot of what I have taken away from this experiance. I didn’t get feedback on this talk (which is a rare and nerve racking thing for me to do), because I just wanted to share my personal raw thoughts about the opportunity to own my learning in a way unlike any other. Without further ado, I hope you enjoy my reflection of this glimpse at the future of education:

 

Crossing Subjects: Engages and Entertains

images-1.jpgI love it when “class” stops being defined by what subject you are talking about.

Today in AP Lang Kat and I made an interesting choice. Rather than spending the period looking up old AP essays and spending a class analyzing and outlining one of them, we instead decided to join the Latin 3 class going on during the same period. But don’t get me wrong, I feel that we were still preparing for our exam next week in a very productive way.

We joined the Latin class because we knew that today they were giving speeches to defend Verres in a law suit where the great orator Cicero was the prosecutor. When the trial originally took place, Cicero’s speech was so amazing  that Verres’ lawyer, Quintus Hortensius who was one of the greatest lawyers of his time, told him to pleed guilty because there was no way they could win the case against Cicero and the defense speech was never given. Therefore, the Latin assignment was to write the unread speech to defend Verres.

The problem is, that Verres really did do some pretty awful things like crucifying Romans and stealing from sacred buildings, so writing a good speech comes entirely down to your use of rhetorical devices. (It’s at this point that a light bulb may be going off saying, “Oh here’s the connection back to AP Lang!”)

Yes, indeed, rather than looking up essays online, Kat and I listened in on about 5 different speeches and outlines/took notes on each of them as if we were going to write a rhetorical analysis essay about how the speaker used rhetorical devices to support their argument.

It was so much fun!!! We got to listen to some hysterical speeches while learning a little Latin and history, while participating in discussions with a larger group, while all the while practicing our rhetorical analysis skills. (Because like I said the case wasn’t one you’re meant to win, you are just meant to throw some crazy arguments together and try to make them sound good.)

Kat and I were even given a refresher on some devices that we had forgotten about because we hadn’t seen them used in a while. Plus I think joining the Latin class helped make us outline at a rapid fire pace because new people kept presenting, so I bet we had far more essay analysis done by the end then we would have otherwise; it’s just so easy to waste a little time here and there looking and deciding what to read or thinking about other big things coming up.

Overall today’s Latin-AP Lang mash up just reminded me how powerful learning can be when you cross disciplines and add a little layer of entertainment to your work.

Learning in the Rain

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Six Flags in rain and Frozen on ice- it’s been a great day!

Today was Physics Day at Six Flags and all of the Calculus students at MVPS got the opportunity to spend the day there! Our teacher makes a deal with her Calc classes every year that if we stay on track and get all of the material we need to cover finished before the end of the year, then we get to go to Six Flags. Normally we would go on math day which is next Friday, however, that day is an important school wide event that we can’t miss so we went on Physics Day.

Part of this deal is also that we have to fill out the packet that Six Flags gives to honor the day which asks questions about various rides, and we use this as a quiz grade. Because it was Physics Day, the questions were primarily physics questions and the hardest math we did was multiply. The thing is, I’m not in a physics class currently so I have not learned many of the concepts discussed on the packet. Luckily we were working on these packets in groups, and I was working with some of my senior friends who are in AP Physics so they were able to teach me some quick physics things.

I learned about the difference between centripetal and centrifugal forces and how to calculate them. I learned about frequency calculations and hertz vs rpm. I learned more about kinetic and potential energy (I know it from a chemistry perspective but not physics really). Plus I learned many other little things. I find it funny because people would think “oh you’re going to Six Flags and are going to miss a whole day of learning in all of your classes,” but the truth is, while we are missing out on “school classes” so to say, we are not missing out on learning. In fact I enjoyed learning some physics today, and found it very helpful that I got to learn it from older students that are in that class. It also meant that they had to make sure they remembered things so they would check each other by asking more questions.

My learning was not hindered by taking a day trip to Six Flags with the Calculus students. I never would have learned as much about physics had I stayed, so in fact by taking “a day off” I was able to further my learning and curiosities about topics that are new to me. I learned in more than just physics too. We also talked about economics, and AP Literature, and calculus AB/BC, and even a little bit of Latin came up at one point.

Despite the rain and waiting in line for 40 minutes to buy lunch, I thought to day was a great school day at Six Flags.

 

 

(And I didn’t mention it further, but I also spent tonight at Frozen on Ice with one of my best friends which was a blast and I liked the way the opening sentence sounded!)

 

We’re Still Lucky

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Today in ID I got the opportunity to video chat with a group of students at a school in London. Their teachers had heard about the Innovation Diploma and had been in contact with our facilitators for a while, and after we had a time change mis-communication the first time, we had to reschedule the video chat for today.

I think it went rather well, and it was cool to know students across the world are taking such an interest in our work. (Even if they were mainly pulled in by a teacher because they were students she knew could ask good questions.)

What I always forget though, is how different our education system is from other countries. For example, they have to take a standardized end of the year exam, so even if they try to create unique programs at their school, they are required to take certain test in order to pass a grade and eventually go to college. This makes things much harder for them, from what we could tell, in terms of trying to change the way they run their school.

We are so often talking about the flaws with American education and how we want to change so many things, that we often forget that we actually still have things pretty well off. We are lucky to have the education system that we have, even if we can (and plan to) make it even better.

Global Book Club

412AlkyPZZL._SX321_BO1,204,203,200_.jpgLast semester in AP Lang, Kat and I received a few pieces of feedback which we’ve used to shape assignments for this semester: “How might you speak with larger audiences to get a wider variety of perspectives involved in discussions?” “How might you go outside your comfort zone when picking reading material?” “How might you read more longer pieces?”

One way we applied this feedback was by hosting our Make Your Mark event a few weeks ago where we brought together teachers and students to have a conversation (and do some tinkering) about the “American Dream.” This event was very successful because we obtained lots of valuable insights from the conversation, and everyone seemed to have fun and many even asked when we could do something similar again.

Now Kat and I have a new plan for a project in AP Lang that was inspired by some of this feedback: The Global Book Club.

Who’s to say when you read a book you can only discuss with the people in your class? Who’s to say teachers and students can’t find the same books interesting? Who’s to say where you’re located on the Earth has to determine who is a part of your learning community, and dare I say “classroom”?

The Global Book Club will address all of these questions.

The plan is for me and Kat to read a one act play by Margaret Edson called Wit. Our aim is to have others from around the world join us. We would like you to join us.

Along the way, if you come across a discussion question you’re curious about, tweet it out using the hashtags #IDHacksAP and #IDgbc so we can keep a running list of discussion ideas. Then, join us on April 15th from 2:15-4pm EST on a Google Hangout where we will read through the play as a group and have a discussion around some of the ideas.

We’ve started the play and so far it is really interesting! We purposefully chose a play as they are meant to be performed and not just read, and we are currently studying about how some words can be even more powerful when said out loud. We also chose this play because it has a central theme around life and death, which is something that everyone can relate to no matter who you are or where you live. The New York Times critic Peter Marks describes it as, “A brutally human and beautifully layered new play . . . You will feel both enlightened and, in a strange way, enormously comforted.”

If you choose to join the Global Book Club, contact me and/or Kat via twitter (@Kat_A_Jones and @Pinyabananas) or by commenting on this blog (or if you have any other way to message us so that we know to include you in the conversation). And remember, even if you can’t make it to the full virtually live discussion, you can still join the conversation on Twitter!

We hope you join the club!

Waiting for Thursdays

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I haven’t blogged in a while. Partially because I’ve been busy and already up too late, but also partially because I haven’t had anything happen that makes me think, “I have to blog about this,” and I didn’t feel like writing more posts about how I’ve been feeling this way for a little while now.

However, today was different. Today was exciting. Today was productive. Today was noteworthy. Today was a Thursday.

It seems that every week we have 3 days of more just planning, responding to emails, trying to organize meetings, then Thursday comes around where we have the first half of the day to work in ID and that’s when we really get to be productive. The last several Thursdays have ended in some kind of big success moment; using the laser cutter to design our logo, having feedback interviews with teachers, going to Georgia Tech to see their facilities and get feedback from a professional,  and then today when we made large strides in the process of having two full scale prototypes done by next Thursday. (Go figure, it’s another Thursday…)

This pattern isn’t just true of the ReSpIn team either. The other teams in ID also had really productive days. One team got pictures taken of everyone and started using makey makey to design a way to visually represent the strengths of every ID cohort member. Another team made huge head way on their design driver and sketch up model for their design brief venture working with  S.J. Collins enterprise to design a pocket park for the new Whole Foods being built in Chamblee.

By the end of the day, everyone was ringing our metaphorical progress bell (we had a physical one, but it always disappears and then shows up randomly). Also today, over half of us even decided that we will come in next Wednesday, when we don’t have school due to a conference day, just so that we can have time to work for a long period of time on our projects.

You know a program is successful when you have students planning for themselves to come in on a day off in order to keep working.

I just wish we there were more Thursday’s in a week. More days where we had large amounts of time to put towards our work. It seems every other day is just waiting for Thursday because that’s when we have the time to go off campus, or schedule meetings with people that don’t have the same schedule as us (Small tangent: it is amazing how hard it is to bridge the gap between school and the real world when the real world runs on such a different schedule. Everyone wants to make meeting appointments for hours and half hours, but most of the time that means we’re in the middle of a class or at the very end or beginning.), or use machines that take more than 50 minutes to get what you want from them.

Sometimes it feels like we’re just constantly waiting for Thursdays, because those are the days we always leave feeling like we actually were really productive and successful in making progress towards a bigger goal in our journey.